Soap maker uses lavender oil to improve skin, hair

The company is using lavender to treat acne and eczema, and hopes the oil will improve the appearance of the skin and hair.

Source: RTE article A spokeswoman for the company, which makes soap with the fragrance Lavender, said the oil had been tested in clinical trials and found to reduce the appearance and severity of eczemias. 

The company said it had found the oil to be “effective and non-irritating” and hoped to make its product commercially available in the next two to three years. 

“The study is a clinical trial, and the results are not a causal link to a clinical condition.

But they do show that lavender has been proven effective and nonirritative for eczymias,” she said.”

Lavender oil has been shown to be effective in reducing eczephasias and acne, and we hope to be able to sell our oil to dermatologists as well as patients with eczems.” 

Lavenders’ fragrance has been known to be used by beauty brands in Japan as well. 

In 2013, Japanese cosmetics company L’Oreal said it was using lavenders as a fragrance ingredient for its cosmetics, but only for its fragrances. 

It has since apologised for the comments. 

A spokeswoman for L’Oréal, which owns La Roche-Posay, said that the company had made “a conscious decision to use lavender oils to treat eczias and other skin problems”. 

“As we’ve seen with other dermatological products, lavender works best on skin and not the hair, and so our product is a safe alternative for treating skin eczemic conditions,” she added.

“We’ve been able to work with the research team to find the oil that works best for us.” 

A spokesman for Dermatology New Zealand, which is a member of the Cochrane Global Forum on Dermatologic Drugs, said he was “surprised” by the news, and said there were many more studies to be done. 

He said the oils could help “to reduce the frequency and severity” of eczaas.

“It is important to note that all oils are effective for treating eczymes, and many are non-opioid-like,” he said.

The spokesperson said the company hoped to “continue to develop new oils and formulations to address the growing problem of eczoa and its related skin conditions”. “

Lavands have a long history of use in Europe and elsewhere and so are unlikely to be a substitute for any prescription drugs.” 

The spokesperson said the company hoped to “continue to develop new oils and formulations to address the growing problem of eczoa and its related skin conditions”. 

He added that the products would be available in New Zealand and abroad “in the near future”.

More to come.

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